I wanted to share a few thoughts on UX and marketing since some of my recent work has focused on that.

Since my last post, I have been focusing heavily on projects that require a new tight UI and UX design. For those that need a refresher, check out this link for a detailed breakdown of the differences between UI and UX. http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2012/06/ui-vs-ux-whats-the-difference/. Essentially, UX design deals with the overall experience associated with the use of a product or service, while UI design deals with the specific user interface(s) of a product or service. Effective UI must include UX design elements. I am going to answer the question today of why you should care about UX as a marketer, because you should!

There are a ton of different resources that give opinions on the principles of UX. Here are my simple 3 “big rules”:

1. Put yourself in the customer’s shoes                                                                                                                                                    You should always be thinking as a customer to contextualize their experiences with you.  Think of the journey from the customer’s perspective.  Customer mapping at different points depicts the journey over time and channels, and shows what the customer is thinking, doing and feeling throughout the whole experience.

2. Clearly define the Rules of Engagement
Engagement Principles are guidelines for the interaction of the service.  These need to be defined up front before development begins. Much of a UI deals with how the service looks and feels and the voice/tone, but where many products are lacking is in customer experience. Think of the process flow. Your brand is on top as the centerpiece. All branches, PDM cycles etc., must support brand tenets. The Brand feeds a style guide, which defines how a product looks and feels. It also feeds a product’s voice and tone  and experience principles or how you interact with the product.

3. Measured Delivery
Figure out how to ship products to customers correctly the first time.  Don’t release a poorly executed product no matter how great the planning and roadmap says it is. Adaptive Path’s CEO Brandon Schauer has a great analogy using cake as a product. Don’t ship the bare cake as v1 and then the filling as v2 and then the icing as v3. Customers don’t think like that. Ship a product that has a little cake, a little filling and a little icing and then your next release can be a larger cake. And of course we need to be concerned with the experience of the first run, since that is the first impression a user has with our product.

I’ve talked about the VOC (voice of the customer) in previous posts as a necessity in the product development process. It is just as important for marketers. If you ask any User Experience Professional what the principles of their profession are, one of the first principles you’ll hear is “Know Your Users”. Makes sense, right?

 If you want to create great experiences for users then you must know something about them.  Plus if you don’t know the customers, how do you know what they want? Figuring out what they want and targeting the offer to that is the special sauce.  The marketing industry existed long before UX came along, and good marketers are as focused on their users as any UX professional is. Wikipedia defines marketing as: “Marketing is used to identify the customer, to keep the customer and to satisfy the customer.

Too often marketers focus on macro demos (age, gender, income marital status, other metadata) to determine users and target offers. I’ve even espoused this as a pillar of good marketing tactics. However, these factors only provide the most basic insight into the life of a user. It does not tell the whole story.

Additionally, good marketing often goes unnoticed. When a marketer does their job and presents a timely and valuable product or service we don’t even notice we are being sold. Similarly, a good UX pro can go unnoticed: great design is invisible to users because they’re too busy enjoying the product or service to even think about it. However, when a marketer focuses on the wrong product attributes or misses the market need, it distracts us and we  notice it.  

As job responsibilities often dictate, UX professionals are more focused on design than marketers are. Usually, people start considering UX as part of the product design or development process that ignored or assumed too much about its users. UX Pros try to right this wrong: they have seen how hurtful a poor understanding of users really is. That’s why the phrase “Know Your Users” is so central to UX. UX pros push to have all of this considered during the ideation phase of the PDM cycle.

In essence, UX is really just good marketing. It’s all about knowing who your market is, knowing what is important to them (walking in their shoes), knowing why it is important to them, designing accordingly (rules of engagement) and measuring the delivery. Once released it’s the job of PLM folks to consistently listen and adjust to the marketplace; improving the experience of those in your market.  If you think about it, good marketers actually do a lot of UX work,  and vice-versa. The next time you are ready to start the PDM process, consider UX and marketing as legs to the product stool. They are inexorably connected.